Contact the Commission

Mailing Address
600 Capitol Way N.
Olympia, WA 98501-1091

Phone: 360-902-2267
Fax: 360-902-2448
commission@dfw.wa.gov

Miranda Wecker, Chair
Bradley Smith, Ph.D., Vice Chair

 

Commission Policy Documents

 << Commission Policy Documents Index

POLICY DECISION

POLICY  TITLE:  Columbia River Basin Salmon Management POLICY NUMBER:  POL-C3620
Supercedes:  C-3617, 2009 Effective Date  January 12, 2013 
  C-3618, 2011 Termination Date  December 31, 2023
See Also: N/A Approved by:  /s/ Miranda Wecker 
Fish and Wildlife Commission Chair 

DOWNLOAD: Signed copy of POL-C3620 (PDF)

Purpose
The objectives of this policy are to promote orderly fisheries (particularly in waters in which the states of Washington and Oregon have concurrent jurisdiction), advance the conservation and recovery of wild salmon and steelhead, and maintain or enhance the economic well-being and stability of the fishing industry in the state.

Definition and Intent
This policy is applicable to the management by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Department) of Pacific salmon (spring Chinook, summer Chinook, fall Chinook, sockeye, chum, and coho) fisheries in the mainstem of the Columbia River and the Snake River.

General Policy Statement
This policy provides the Department a cohesive set of guiding principles and a progressive series of actions to improve the management of salmon in the Columbia River basin.  The actions will be evaluated and, as appropriate, progressively implemented in a transitional period occurring from 2013 through 2016.  There is uncertainty in this presumptive path forward, including the development and implementation of alternative selective fishing gear, securing funding for enhanced hatchery production, and the expansion or development of off-channel fishing areas.  Consequently, the Commission recognizes that management decisions in the transitional period, and subsequent years, must be informed by fishery monitoring (biological and economic) and may be modified as necessary to meet the stated purpose of this policy.

The Department will promote the conservation and recovery of wild salmon and steelhead and provide fishery-related benefits by maintaining orderly fisheries and by increasingly focusing on the harvest of abundant hatchery fish.  The Department will seek to implement mark-selective salmon and steelhead fisheries, or other management approaches that are at least as effective, in achieving spawner and broodstock management objectives.

Fishery and hatchery management measures should be implemented as part of an “all-H” strategy that integrates hatchery, harvest, hydro-system and habitat actions.  Although it focuses on hatchery and harvest reform, this policy in no way diminishes the significance of habitat and hydro-system protection and restoration.

In implementing the policy guidelines, the Department will work with the tribes in a manner that is consistent with U.S. v. Washington and U.S. v. Oregon and other applicable state and federal laws and agreements.

Guiding Principles
The Department will apply the following principles in the management of salmon fisheries in the Columbia River:

  1. Promote the recovery of Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed species and the conservation of wild stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River and ensure that fisheries and hatcheries are operated in a manner consistent with the provisions of the ESA.
  2. Continue leadership on fish recovery actions, including improved fish survival through the Columbia River hydropower system, improved habitat conditions in the tributaries and estuary, hatchery reform, reduced predation by fish, birds, and marine mammals, and harvest management that meets conservation responsibilities.
  3. Continue to meet the terms of U.S. v. Oregon management agreements with Columbia River Treaty Tribes.
  4. Meet Colville tribal subsistence and ceremonial needs consistent with agreements with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.
  5. Provide Wanapum Band fishing opportunity consistent with RCW 77.12.453 (“Salmon fishing by Wanapum (Sokulk) Indians”).
  6. In a manner that is consistent with conservation and does not impair the resource, seek to enhance the overall economic well-being and stability of Columbia River fisheries.
  7. Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this Policy, for steelhead and salmon, prioritize recreational fisheries in the mainstem and commercial fisheries in off-channel areas of the lower Columbia River.
  8. Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this Policy, and after thorough evaluation, seek to phase out the use of non-selective gill nets in non-tribal commercial fisheries in the mainstem Columbia River, and transition gill net use to off-channel areas.
  9. In a manner consistent with the Department’s licensing authorities, develop and implement alternative selective-fishing gear and techniques for commercial mainstem fisheries to optimize conservation and economic benefits.  Provide incentives to commercial fishers to develop and implement these gear and techniques.
  10. Enhance the economic benefits of off-channel commercial fisheries in a manner consistent with conservation and wild stock recovery objectives.
  11. Seek to maintain consistent and concurrent policies between Oregon and Washington related to management of non-tribal Columbia River fisheries.
  12. Develop a program that seeks to implement Marine Stewardship Council or other certification of salmon fisheries in the Columbia River as sustainably managed fisheries.

General Provisions
The Department will implement the following actions to promote the achievement of the purpose of this policy.

  1. Gill Net License Buyback Program.  Initiate in 2013 the development (with Oregon) of a program to buyback non-tribal gill net permits for the Columbia River and implement that program as soon as the appropriate authority and financing is secured.  Efforts should be made to also develop, evaluate, and implement other tools (e.g., minimum landing requirements) to reduce the number of gillnet permits.
  2. Development and Implementation of Alternative Selective Gear in Transition Period.  The Department will investigate and promote the development and implementation of alternative selective gear during the transition period (2013-2016).  If alternative selective gear is not available and practical, based on administrative, biological or economic factors, the use of gill nets in these fisheries will be allowed during the transition period.  The development and implementation of alternative selective gear such as purse seines and beach seines should provide area-specific opportunity to target fishery harvests on abundant hatchery stocks, reduce the number of hatchery-origin fish in natural spawning areas, limit mortalities of non-target species and stocks, and provide commercial fishing opportunities.  To facilitate the timely development of and transition to alternative selective gear and techniques, Washington should work with Oregon to develop incentives for those commercial fishers who agree to use these gear and techniques.
  3. Development and Implementation of Alternative Selective Gear in Long Term. Subject to available legal authorities and the adaptive management provisions of this Policy, and after thorough evaluation, non-tribal mainstem commercial fisheries should be restricted to the use of alternative selective gear and fishing techniques beginning in 2017.  With respect to Upriver Bright fall Chinook, the presumptive path forward regarding targeted commercial harvest upstream of the Lewis River is to access these Chinook with alternative selective gear and techniques.  Because access to Upriver Bright fall Chinook is critically important to ensuring the long-term economic health of commercial fishers, adaptive management will be used to ensure available gear types and techniques are effective and that commercial fishers continue to have profitable mainstem access to these important salmon stocks.
  4. Additional Opportunities for Mainstem Commercial Fisheries in the Transition Period. During the transition period, opportunities for additional mainstem commercial fishing directed at Upriver Bright fall Chinook and hatchery coho salmon using alternative selective gear, or gill nets if alternative selective gear is not available and practical, may be provided under the following conditions:    
    1. If mainstem recreational fisheries are predicted to be unable to fully use their shares of ESA-impacts or harvestable surplus, or
    2. If reasonable goals1 for mainstem recreational fisheries are predicted to be met, or
    3. If alternative selective gear programs, off channel fishing opportunities, or other commercial fishing program elements of this Policy are unable to provide the anticipated catch and economic expectations to the commercial salmon fishing industry.
  5. Additional Opportunities for Mainstem Commercial Fisheries in the Long Term. After the transition period, opportunities for additional mainstem commercial fishing directed at Upriver Bright fall Chinook, lower river hatchery fall Chinook, and hatchery coho salmon may be provided under the following conditions:
    1. If mainstem recreational fisheries are predicted to be unable to fully use their shares of ESA-impacts or harvestable surplus, or
    2. If reasonable goals for mainstem recreational fisheries are predicted to be met, or
    3. As needed to remove lower river hatchery tule Chinook and coho consistent with conservation objectives, or
    4. If alternative selective gear programs, off channel fishing opportunities, or other commercial fishing program elements of this Policy are unable to provide the anticipated catch and economic expectations to the commercial salmon fishing industry.
  6. Off-Channel Commercial Fishing Sites.  Seek funding (with Oregon) to evaluate the feasibility of establishing new off-channel sites.  Seek funding to invest in the infra-structure and fish rearing and acclimation operations necessary to establish new off-channel sites in Washington, as identified by evaluations completed during the transition period.
  7. Barbless Hooks.  Implement in 2013 the use of barbless hooks in all mainstem Columbia River and tributary fisheries for salmon and steelhead.
  8. Logbooks.  Evaluate the benefits of requiring licensed recreational fishing guides and charters to maintain and use logbooks.  Logbook reporting could provide fishery managers with additional catch and harvest data on guided salmon, steelhead, sturgeon fishing trips on the Columbia River.  In addition, evaluate the use of volunteer trip reports in private boat fisheries.
  9. Enhance Fishery Management.  Because implementation of this policy will change the current management of fisheries and because run-size forecasts play a vital role in shaping fisheries, two enhancements will be put in place during the transition period.
    1. Increase Management Certainty.  Increase management certainty, and ensure conservation effectiveness by: implementing outreach programs to increase compliance with recreational fishing rules; seeking means to increase the effectiveness of enforcement programs; and conducting enhanced fishery monitoring that more accurately accounts for harvest and fishing-related mortality.
    2. Improve Management Tools.  Explore and develop alternative approaches to improve: pre-season forecasts of run size and timing; in-season updates of run-size estimates; and in-season estimates of the harvest impacts by fishery.

Spring Chinook Salmon
The presumptive path for the management of spring Chinook salmon fisheries is summarized in Appendix Table A.  Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage spring Chinook salmon fisheries consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following objectives:

  1. The Department will exercise in-season management flexibility to utilize the non-Indian upriver spring Chinook impact allocation to meet the objectives of both fisheries, i.e., upriver impact sharing adjustments in response to in-season information pertaining to catch and run size.
  2. Fishery Management Buffer.  To account for uncertainties in the information used to plan and implement fisheries, a management buffer in fishery structure will be established and applied to fisheries occurring prior to the run size update (primarily in March and April).  The buffer is intended to be sufficient to cover potential run-size forecasting error and ensure compliance with ESA requirements and U.S. v. Oregon allocation provisions.  Prior to the run size update, the Department will manage non-treaty fisheries for a run size that is 70% of the pre-season forecast (30% buffer) or other fishery management buffer as agreed through U.S. v. Oregon.  During the transition period, the overall buffer will be achieved by applying: a fishery management buffer of 20% of the sport fishery impact to the sport fishery; and a fishery management buffer of 40% of the commercial fishery impact to the commercial fishery.
  3. Recreational-Commercial Allocation During Transition Period (2013-2016).  In 2013, the Department will assign 65% of the ESA-impact for upriver spring Chinook stocks to mainstem recreational fisheries and the balance (35%) to off-channel and mainstem commercial fisheries.

    During 2014-16, the Department will assign 70% of the ESA-impact for upriver spring Chinook stocks to mainstem recreational fisheries and the balance (30%) to off-channel and mainstem commercial fisheries
  4. Recreational-Commercial Allocation in Long Term (2017 and Beyond).  The Department will assign 80% of the ESA-impact to mainstem recreational fisheries to meet management objectives and the balance (20%) to commercial fisheries for use in off-channel areas.  The commercial fishery ESA-impact share will not be subject to the pre-run-size update buffer in the off-channel areas.
  5. The Department will ensure broad geographic distribution of recreational fishing opportunity in the main-stem Columbia River including the Snake River.  Seventy-five percent (75%) of the impacts allocated to the sport fisheries will be assigned to the sport fishery downstream from Bonneville Dam.  Twenty-five percent (25%) will be assigned and reserved for the sport fishery upstream from Bonneville Dam. After the run-size update, the Department will place the highest sport fishery priority on providing for a sport fishery upstream from Bonneville Dam. .
  6. The Department will provide to the Commission each year a briefing on the effectiveness of fishery management actions in meeting spring Chinook recreational fishery allocation objectives throughout the Columbia River basin.  The Commission may consider changes to the recreational allocation in this policy in the future to balance recreational fishery objectives in the areas below Bonneville Dam, above Bonneville Dam, and in the Snake River.
  7. Without compromising the objectives for recreational fisheries upstream of Bonneville Dam, the Department will seek in the long-term to extend recreational fishing opportunity downstream of Bonneville Dam as long into April as possible, with a high probability of an uninterrupted 45-season beginning March 1.

Summer Chinook Salmon
The presumptive path for the management of summer Chinook salmon fisheries is summarized in Appendix Table B.  Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage summer Chinook salmon fisheries consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following objectives:

  1. The Department will manage the upper Columbia summer Chinook populations for sustainable natural production and for the artificial production programs that are necessary to meet mitigation requirements and provide conservation safeguards.
  2. The Department will manage for population specific performance goals for Wenatchee, Methow and Okanogan natural populations, and for hatchery escapement goals.
  3. Non-treaty Sharing Above and Below Priest Rapids Dam.  The highest priority for state managed summer Chinook fisheries is recreational fishing opportunity above Priest Rapids Dam.  In light of the changing abundance of summer Chinook, the Department will adjust the allocation of the non-treaty (including the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation) harvest assigned to fisheries above Priest Rapids Dam to be consistent with the following guidelines:

    River-mouth
    run size
    Percent of non-treaty allocation
    assigned to fisheries above Priest Rapids Dam
    0 – 29,000 >90%
    29,001 – 50,000 90%
    50,001 – 60,000 70% - 90%
    60,001 – 75,000 65% - 70%
    75,001 – 100,000 60% - 65%
    >100,000 60%
  4. Nontreaty Sharing Below Priest Rapids Dam.  The harvestable surplus available for nontreaty fisheries below Priest Rapids Dam will be allocated as follows:
    1. Through 2014, assign 60% of the nontreaty harvestable surplus to mainstem recreational fisheries and the balance (40%) to mainstem commercial fisheries.
    2. Beginning in 2015 and for the remainder of the transition period (through 2016), assign 70% of the harvestable surplus to the recreational fisheries and the balance (30%) to commercial fisheries.
    3. The Recreational-Commercial allocation beginning in 2017 will be determined following additional discussions with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
  5. Provide for in-season management flexibility to utilize the non-treaty summer Chinook harvest to meet the objectives of all fisheries. 

Sockeye Salmon
Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage sockeye salmon fisheries consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following objectives:

  1. During 2013-2016, assign 70% of the ESA-impact for Snake River sockeye to mainstem recreational fisheries and the balance (30%) to mainstem commercial fisheries for incidental harvest of sockeye in Chinook-directed fisheries.
  2. Beginning in 2017, assign approximately 80% of the ESA-impact for Snake River sockeye to mainstem recreational fisheries to meet management objectives and the balance (approximately 20%) to mainstem commercial fisheries for incidental harvest of sockeye in Chinook-directed fisheries.
  3. If NOAA Fisheries increases the allowable ESA-impact for Snake River sockeye, the Department will provide opportunities for increased commercial harvest using alternative selective gear if developed and practical, within the constraints of achieving escapement objectives for other sockeye populations in the Columbia River Basin.

Tule Fall Chinook Salmon
The presumptive path for the management of tule fall Chinook salmon fisheries is summarized in Appendix Table C.  Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage tule fall Chinook fisheries consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following objectives:

  1. During 2013-2016, the Department will assign no more than 70% of the ESA-impact for lower Columbia River tule fall Chinook to mainstem recreational fisheries to meet management objectives and the balance (not less than 30%) to: off-channel commercial fisheries; mainstem commercial fisheries that target Upriver Bright fall Chinook; and, if selective gear is developed during the transition period, mainstem commercial fisheries that harvest Washington Lower River Hatchery Chinook to help reduce strays.
  2. Beginning in 2017, the Department will assign no more than 80% of the ESA-impact for lower Columbia River tule fall Chinook to mainstem recreational fisheries to meet management objectives and the balance (not less than 20%) to: off-channel commercial fisheries; mainstem commercial fisheries that target Upriver Bright fall Chinook; and mainstem commercial fisheries that harvest Washington Lower River Hatchery Chinook with selective gear to help reduce strays.
  3. The Department will seek to achieve the following recreational fisheries objectives:
    1. Buoy 10 season – August 1 to Labor Day
    2. Tongue Point to Warrior Rock season – August 1 to September 7 as non-mark-selective and September 8-14 as mark-selective
    3. Warrior Rock to Bonneville Dam season – August 1-October 31. 

Upriver Bright Fall Chinook Salmon
The presumptive path for the management of Upriver Bright fall Chinook salmon fisheries is summarized in Appendix Table D.  Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage Upriver Bright fall Chinook fisheries consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following objectives:

  1. During 2013-2016, the Department will assign no more than 70% of the ESA-impact for Snake River Wild fall Chinook to mainstem recreational fisheries to meet management objectives and the balance (not less than 30%) to off-channel and mainstem commercial fisheries.
  2. Beginning in 2017, the Department will assign no more than 80% of the ESA-impact for Snake River Wild fall Chinook to mainstem recreational fisheries to meet management objectives and the balance (not less than 20%) to off-channel and mainstem commercial fisheries.
  3. a) The Department will focus mainstem commercial fisheries to target Upriver Bright fall Chinook in the area upstream of the Lewis River where the incidental take of lower river tule Chinook is reduced;

    b) Harvest of Upriver Bright fall Chinook in the area downstream from the Lewis River will occur in selective fisheries that target Washington Lower River Hatchery Chinook and coho.
  4. The presumptive path forward regarding targeted commercial harvest of Upriver Bright fall Chinook upstream of the Lewis River will be to access available Chinook with alternative selective gear and techniques. Because access to Upriver Bright fall Chinook will be important to ensuring the long-term economic viability of commercial fishers, adaptive management will be used to ensure alternative selective gear and techniques are effective and that commercial fishers continue to have profitable mainstem access to these economically important salmon stocks.

Coho Salmon
The presumptive path for the management of coho salmon fisheries is summarized in Appendix Table E.  Subject to the adaptive management provisions of this policy, the Department will manage coho fisheries consistent with the Guiding Principles and the following objectives:

  1. During 2013-2016, the Department will assign: commercial fisheries a sufficient share of the ESA-impact for Lower Columbia Natural coho to implement off-channel coho and fall Chinook fisheries and mainstem fall Chinook fisheries; and  the balance to in-river mainstem recreational fisheries (currently in-river mainstem recreational fisheries are assigned a sufficient share of the allowable incidental-take of ESA-listed coho to meet fishery objectives).  If these fisheries are expected to be unable to use all of the ESA-impact for Lower Columbia Natural coho, the Department will assign the remainder to mainstem commercial coho fisheries.  As selective techniques and alternative gear are developed, the Department will provide additional commercial mainstem coho fisheries with an emphasis on harvesting hatchery coho in October when wild coho are less abundant.
  2. Beginning in 2017, the Department will assign: commercial fisheries a sufficient share of the ESA-impact for Lower Columbia Natural coho to implement off-channel coho and fall Chinook fisheries and mainstem fall Chinook fisheries; and the balance to in-river mainstem recreational fisheries. If these fisheries are unable to use all of the ESA-impact for Lower Columbia Natural coho, the Department will assign the remainder to mainstem commercial coho fisheries.  It is expected that substantial new opportunities for selective mainstem commercial fisheries will be available for hatchery coho, particularly in October.

Chum Salmon
The Department will maintain the current practice of opening no fisheries that target chum salmon and assign commercial fisheries a sufficient share of the ESA-impact for chum to implement off-channel and mainstem fisheries targeting other salmon species (retention in recreational fisheries is currently prohibited).

Adaptive Management
The Commission recognizes that appendix tables A-E describe a presumptive path forward for salmon fishery management in the Columbia Basin.  Uncertainty exists in some aspects of the presumptive path, including the development and implementation of alternative selective fishing gear, the securing of funding for enhanced hatchery production, and the expansion or development of off-channel fishing areas.  Under these conditions, adaptive management procedures will be essential to achieve the purpose of this policy.  As indicated in the General Policy statement, management actions will be evaluated and, as appropriate, implemented in a progressive manner.

The Commission will track implementation and results of the fishery management actions and artificial production programs in the lower Columbia River during the transition period, with annual reviews beginning at the end of 2013 and a comprehensive review at the end of the transition period (e.g., 2016).  State-managed fisheries pursuant to this Policy will be adaptive and adjustments may be made to mainstem fisheries if policy objectives, including catch or economic expectations for commercial or recreational fisheries, are not achieved consistent with the principles of this plan.  If these expectations are not achieved, efforts will be made to determine why and to identify actions necessary to correct course.  Department staff may implement actions necessary to manage adaptively to achieve the objectives of this policy and will coordinate with the Commission, as needed, in order to implement corrective actions.  Reconsideration of state-managed mainstem fisheries may take place under the following circumstances:

  1. Lower than anticipated catch and economic expectations to the commercial salmon fishing industry, or
  2. Insufficient space within off-channel sites to accommodate the commercial fleet, or
  3. Biological, fiscal and/or legal circumstances that delay or preclude implementation of alternative selective gear, buyback of commercial fishing permits, and/or additional off-channel hatchery investments, or
  4. Management objectives are not achieved for commercial or recreational fisheries, or
  5. Conflicts with terms of U.S. v Oregon management agreements with Columbia River Tribes, or
  6. Failure to meet conservation objectives.

Planned enhancements of salmon and steelhead production upstream from Bonneville Dam may have implications to harvest management contemplated in this plan.  For production enhancements that come on-line and produce adult salmon on or after 2017, Oregon and Washington staff should evaluate the implications of the increased mainstem production on these harvest strategies, including U.S. v. Oregon harvest agreements, and make additional recommendations to the Commission as needed, consistent with the guiding principles.

Delegation of Authority
The Commission delegates the authority to the Director, through the Columbia River Compact and North of Falcon stakeholder consultation process, to set seasons for recreational and commercial fisheries in the Columbia River, to adopt permanent and emergency regulations to implement these fisheries, and to make harvest agreements with treaty tribes and other government agencies.  The Director will work with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to achieve implementation of this Commission action in a manner that results in concurrent regulations between the two states.  The Director will consult with the Commission Chair if it becomes necessary to deviate from the Commission’s policy to achieve concurrent regulations with Oregon.

1 See Appendix B of Mainstem Strategies for Columbia River recreational and Commercial Fisheries:  2013 and Beyond.  Recommendation of the Columbia River Fishery Management Workgroup to the Fish and Wildlife Commissions of Oregon and Washington.  November 21, 2012.

Appendices

Appendix A.  Tabular Summary of the Presumptive Management Framework for Non-Tribal Mainstem Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries - Spring Chinook Salmon.

Sharing Metric:  Incidental-take of ESA-listed upriver spring Chinook

Fishing Year Recreational Fishery Commercial Fishery
Impact Share Location Share Location Gear
2013 65% Mainstem Columbia River and Snake River 35% Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam Tangle Net
Off-Channel Areas Tangle-Net/ Gill Net
2014-2016 70% Mainstem Columbia River and Snake River 30% Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam Tangle Net
Off-Channel Areas Tangle Net/ Gill Net
2017+ 80% Mainstem Columbia River and Snake River 20%1 Off-channel and mainstem areas of the Columbia River Tangle Net/ Gill Net2/ Beach Seine/ Purse Seine/Other Alternative Selective Gear
  1. Not subject to pre-update buffer.
  2. 2 Gill nets confined to off-channel areas

Appendix B.  Tabular Summary of the Presumptive Management Framework for Non-Tribal Mainstem Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries – Summer Chinook Salmon.

Sharing Metric:  Harvestable share of summer Chinook available downstream from Priest Rapids Dam

Fishery-Specific Objective: Meet terms of agreements with the United Tribes of the Colville Reservation.

Fishing Year Recreational Fishery Commercial Fishery1
Share Location Share Location Gear
2013-2014 60% Mainstem Columbia River below Priest Rapids Dam 40% Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Gill Net
2015-2016 70% Mainstem Columbia River below Priest Rapids Dam 30% Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Gill Net
2017+ TBD2 Mainstem Columbia River below Priest Rapids Dam TBD Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Beach Seine/ Purse Seine/ Other Alternative Selective Gear
  1. To offset reductions in mainstem commercial harvest of summer Chinook, Oregon will enhance the fisheries for Select Area Bright Fall Chinook.
  2. Recreational- Commercial allocations will be determined following additional discussions with the Oregon department of Fish and Wildlife.

Appendix C.  Tabular Summary of the Presumptive Management Framework for Non-Tribal Mainstem Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries – Tule Fall Chinook Salmon.

Sharing Metric:  Incidental-take of ESA-listed Lower Columbia River natural (tule) fall Chinook

Fishing Year Recreational Fishery Commercial Fishery
Share Location Share Location Gear
2013-2015 <70% Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam >30% Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and off-channel areas Gill Net/ Pilot Beach Seine/ Pilot Purse Seine
2016 <70% Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam >30% Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Beach Seine/ Purse Seine
Off-channel areas Gill Net
2017+ <80% Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam >20% Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Beach Seine/ Purse Seine/ Other Alternative Selective Gear
Off-channel areas Gill Net

Appendix D.  Tabular Summary of the Presumptive Management Framework for Non-Tribal Mainstem Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries – Upriver Bright Chinook Salmon.

Sharing Metric:  Incidental-take of ESA-listed Snake River wild fall Chinook

Fishery-Specific Objective: Implement mainstem commercial fisheries in Zones 4 and 5 upstream of the Lewis River to remove excess hatchery-origin bright Chinook and harvest surplus wild bright Chinook

Fishing Year

Recreational Fishery Commercial Fishery
Share Location Share Location Gear
2013-2016 Necessary to meet recreational objectives, but not more than 70%1 Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam Dependant on recreational fisheries need, but not less than 30% Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Gill Net2/ Beach Seine3/ Purse Seine3
2017+ Necessary to meet recreational objectives, but not more than 80% Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam  Dependant on recreational fisheries need, but not less than 20% Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam Beach Seine/ Purse Seine/ Other Alternative Selective Gear
Above Lewis River Alternative Selective Gear4
  1. It is expected that recreational fishery objectives (Buoy 10 season August 1-Labor Day; Tongue Point to Warrior Rock season August 1-September 7 as non-mark selective and September 8-14 as mark selective and Warrior Rock to Bonneville Dam season August 1-October 31 when the season is assumed to be essentially complete) will be met in most years at less than a 50% share of Snake River Wild fall Chinook impacts (see Appendix B, Table B.3).  However, the recreational fishery share will likely need to be increased to meet objectives in years when Upriver Bright fall Chinook returns are significantly less than recent years.
  2. The mainstem gill net fishery will be restricted to the area above the Lewis River in 2016.
  3. Beach seine and purse seine fisheries will be pilots in 2013, 2014 and 2015.
  4. The presumptive (expected) path forward regarding targeted commercial harvest of Upriver Bright fall Chinook upstream of the Lewis River will be to access available Chinook with alternative selective gear and techniques.  Because access to Upriver Bright fall Chinook is critically important to ensuring the long-term economic viability of commercial fishers, adaptive management will be used to ensure alternative selective gear and techniques are effective and that commercial fishers continue to have profitable mainstem access to these economically important salmon stocks.

Appendix E.  Tabular Summary of the Presumptive Management Framework for Non-Tribal Mainstem Columbia River Recreational and Commercial Fisheries – Coho Salmon.

Sharing Metric:  Incidental-take of ESA-listed coho

Fishing Year Recreational Fishery Commercial Fishery
Share Location Share Location Gear
2013-2016 1 Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam 1 Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and off-channel areas Gill Net/ Tangle Net2Beach/ Seine2
Purse Seine2
2017+ 3 Mainstem Columbia below Bonneville Dam 3 Mainstem Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and off-channel areas Tangle Net/ Beach Seine/ Purse Seine/ Other Alternative Selective Gear
  1. Maintain current sharing except provide sufficient additional impacts to the commercial fishery to implement the pilot alternative selective gear fisheries.
  2. Tangle net, beach seine and purse seine fisheries will be pilots in 2013, 2014 and 2015.
  3. Assign commercial fisheries a sufficient share of the ESA-impact for Lower Columbia Natural coho to implement off-channel coho fisheries, fall Chinook fisheries as described above, and alternative selective gear fisheries to reduce the number of hatchery-origin coho in natural spawning areas.  Assign the balance to mainstem recreational fisheries.  If these recreational fisheries are unable to use all of the ESA-impact for Lower Columbia Natural coho, assign the remainder to mainstem commercial coho fisheries.